Tag Archives: History

Sligo: Potato Famine 1845 (1)

Between 1847 and 1851 over 30,000 people emigrated through the port of Sligo. On the Quayside, overlooking the Garavogue River, is a sculpted memorial to the emigrants. This is one of a suite of three sculptures commissioned by the Sligo … Continue reading

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SALAMIS: the watershed

After the Persian victories at Artemisium and Thermopylae, king Xerxes proceeded to Athens, which he captured in the last days of September 480. Meanwhile, the Greek navy, which had managed to get away from Artemisium, stayed on the isle of … Continue reading

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From Gibbon to Goebbels? The Historians’ Trajectory

Gibbon and Goebbels are not the obvious choices for comparison to Herodotus and Thucydides, but bear with me. H & T are frequently regarded as the “first historians.” They wrote the book, you might say, on how to do history. … Continue reading

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Is “Saxon town” a misnomer?

Today, we distinguish the ideas of “urban” and “rural” quite readily. In fact, we are heirs to a whole raft of concepts and snobbery about “townies” and “bumpkins” that have existed for centuries. The Romans made the same distinction. But … Continue reading

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Civil War Soldiers: Letter home

“Chattanooga July 27th, 1864 My dear wife, You will perceive from the heading of this that I am at Chattanooga. I obtained the position I have been seeking so long and am now with the Judge Advocate on Gen. Thomas’ … Continue reading

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Teaching History

Great post from James Daley about the way we teach History at school in the UK. The amount of people who’ve said to me “This is so interesting, but I had a really boring teacher at school. Put me off … Continue reading

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Lenin as Social Architect

It is perhaps significant that Lenin’s biggest contribution to modern Russian life is a monument to death. It was, after all, his characteristic answer to most problems. Lenin’s period of control over Russia (1917-1924) was dominated by war, conflict and … Continue reading

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Assessing the Character of Nicholas II

“The daily work of a monarch he found intolerably boring. He could not stand listening long or seriously to ministers’ reports, or reading them.” Written by Kerensky, the leader of the government which took over from the Tsar in 1917, … Continue reading

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WHAT IF? The Corsican Crisis 1768

One of the more fascinating “what ifs” of European history has to be the handling of the Corsican Crisis of 1768-69.

Posted in A Level History, British Empire, Empire and Expansion, History, Rise of Empire 1660-1760 | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Historians are seedy and horrible, says Terry Deary

Article by Sarah Ebner He owes his success to history, but the author Terry Deary has described historians as “seedy and devious”. From The Times May 31, 2010

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